This is a songbook of over 300 hymns translated to the Ebembe language. This language is spoken by the Babembe people who live in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo in Central Africa near Lake Tanganyika. The songbook was collected and translated by Pastor J.M. Abekyamwale.

It is an older copy, so please pardon the quality of some of the pages and the writing that is on many of the pages.

Populist Saints warmly tells the story of B. T. and Ellen Roberts’s lives, recounting their critique of powerful elites and illuminating the “crisis of Methodism” that gave rise to the Free Methodist Church. Benjamin Titus Roberts (1823–1893), best known for founding the Free Methodist Church, was also an outspoken voice for such reform causes as the abolition of slavery, women in ministry, and farmers’ rights — so much so that he played a role in the rise of the Populist Movement. Ellen Stowe Roberts (1825–1908), scion of a prominent Methodist family, shared her husband’s passion for holiness, for speaking good news to the poor, and for urban ministry.

Howard Snyder’s detailed biography views key nineteenth-century currents and events through the lives of these two extraordinary figures, who taught a “holy populism” of simplicity, justice for the common people, and radical discipleship.

Howard A. Snyder is professor of the history and theology of mission at Asbury Theological Seminary, Wilmore, Kentucky.

The Marston Memorial Historical Center and the B.L. Fisher Library of Asbury Theological Seminary are in partnership to produce digitized materials and reprints of important historical works from the Free Methodist tradition through Asbury Theological Seminary’s First Fruits Press. Of an initial 25 projects proposed, some books have been finished and are currently available at http://place.asburyseminary.edu/freemethodistbooks/. It is the hope of First Fruits Press, the B.L. Fisher Library, Asbury Theological Seminary and the Marston Historical Center that this partnership will further study and research into the history and influence of the Free Methodist Church by both academics and lay people alike-.